Rep. Claman’s May 19th Newsletter: Governor Calls Special Session and Anchorage Constituent Hours

On Wednesday evening, the legislature adjourned without an agreement on a budget, a restructuring of the Permanent Fund, or revenue measures to address the state’s $2.7 billion deficit. Shortly after adjourning, the Governor called the legislature into a special session to continue our work.

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Speaker Edgmon’s May 12th Newsletter: With Day 121 Approaching, Legislature Likely to Require More Time

With just five days left before we hit the May 17 endpoint of the Constitutionally authorized 121-day legislative session, and with several major pieces of legislation still the subject of hearings or conference committee negotiations, it is clear that work in Juneau will continue into another stage of overtime.

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Rep. Seaton’s May 1st Newsletter

Greetings from Juneau this 105th day of session. I want to start this newsletter by thanking all of you for taking time to be part of the process. Your opinions, comments, and questions help move the conversation forward. Whether you agree with my viewpoint or not, every voice counts. I want to hear from you so please keep testifying, calling my office and emailing.

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Rep. Claman’s April 28th Newsletter: Budget Updates

Today marks the 102nd day of the session. The House has passed its four-pillared responsible action plan to the Senate for consideration. As the House hears additional legislation, the budget remains our top priority and we’re committed to working together with the Senate.

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Rep. Seaton’s April 27th Newsletter: Update: State Reductions & Diversifying Revenue

Hello! Some information came out this week that I wanted to share with you. This past Monday, the Institute of Taxation and Economic Policy released their report: Comparing the Distributional Impact of Revenue Options in Alaska. This report compares the impact of different revenue plans being discussed in Juneau this session. The report finds that most Alaska households would pay less under a personal income tax, like our HB 115 School Tax, than they would under a 3% sales tax even if the sales tax exempted food, child care and rent.

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